EFFECTS OF MORAL UPBRINGING ON CHILD’S ACADEMIC PERFORMANE IN SECONDARY SCHOOLS KOLGA LOCAL GOVERNMENT AREA

EFFECTS OF MORAL UPBRINGING ON CHILD’S ACADEMIC PERFORMANE IN SECONDARY SCHOOLS KOLGA LOCAL GOVERNMENT AREA

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ABSTRACT

        The aim of this study was to find out the effects of moral upbringing on child’s academic performance in secondary schools kolga local government.  To carry out the study, five (5) research questions were raised out of which five (5) hypotheses were formulated; they were:

1.  There is no significant difference between children from wealthy parents and those from poor parents in terms of academic performance.

2.  There is no difference in the academic performance of children from polygamous families and the children from monogamous families.

3.  There is no significant difference in the moral upbringing effecting academic performance between children from large family and those from small family.

4.  There is no significant difference in the academic achievement of children from educated homes and those from uneducated homes.

5.  There is no major difference in the academic achievements of children from broken homes and children from intact homes.

A questionnaire instrument was used for data collection and one hundred students were selected (twenty from each school).  The percentage statistical tool was used by the researcher in analyzing the data collected.

        From the analysis, it was found out that:

i.            There is significant relationship between the moral upbringing and their children’s academic performance in school.

ii.          There is significant difference between the academic achievement of children from broken homes and those from unbroken homes.

iii.        There is a significant difference in academic performance between children from large family and those from small family.

iv.         There is a significant difference between the academic achievement of children from educated homes and those from uneducated homes.

v.           There is a significant difference between the academic achievement of children from polygamous families and those from monogamous families.

Thereafter, some useful suggestions were made as possible solutions to the problems identified.

CHAPTER ONE

INTRODUCTION

1.1   Background to the Study

All aspects of a man's life - his character, sense of responsibility, good and bad habits, ability to cope with difficulties, and his piety - are shaped primarily during his childhood. The bright memories of his childhood can strengthen and warm a man during trying times, and, defiantly, those who have not had a happy childhood can in no way remake it. When i meet an orphan during the cause of these research, who has never had parental affection, or a step-son or step-daughter whose broken spirits are a result of difficulties at home, or those left to the care of strangers, we can sense in them the imprint of painful early impressions.   

Man as a public being is gifted with different abilities to investigate his moral upbringing on the academic performance in secondary school and possibly to improve the lots of mankind.  That is why there are differences in educational attainment of students.

Moral upbringing is a key to every child cultured attitude to life and approach to issues in everyday activities in school and homes and where the find their self they children tends to display good or bad behavior learn or develop at home causes by disrespect of father and mother fighting.

PARENTS RAISED THEIR CHILD, TEACHING THEM RIGHT FROM WRONG, SO THEY ARE MORALLY RESPONSIBLE.

Parents are the "leaders" of their child. Parents should watch over their children and teach them how life works. If they don't teach well, their children might just ignore their parents, but it's up to the parent to correct that behavior. For example, a student is done with school for the day, but he comes home to an empty house because his parents are at work. All of a sudden, he climbs on a car and starts stomping on that car. It is the parents' responsibility because his parents should have come home to direct or found an after-school program. Also, if a parent starts saying bad words, their children might follow from their parents' poor behavior. Again, it comes down to it being the parents' fault for not being a good role model

  UPBRINGING AND THE SCHOLASTIC EDUCATION

A Christian upbringing lays a moral and spiritual foundation in a child, while a scholastic education aims at developing his mental abilities. These are two different activities. There is no reason to think that scholastic education automatically facilitates the moral development of a child. Some people may be very educated but ill-bred and unspiritual. On the other hand, totally uneducated peasants can be highly spiritual and moral people.

Any upbringing, either within the family or the school, can only pursue temporary aims related to the needs of the family and society when divorced from religion. For instance, the aim of education in totalitarian countries is to make a person an obedient instrument of the government. In contemporary public schools in the Nigeria and many other countries, the object of education is not a person's highest welfare or his spiritual integrity, but the material needs of the government and community. An Orthodox religious upbringing, on the other hand, is concerned with the moral development of the soul and is guided by eternal spiritual principles. Here the content does not change with political trends or new sociological ideas but is founded on Divine revelation. Parents should direct their child not according to fashion or society's needs but according to the Word of God.

The parent should come up with ideas to pass good moral upbringing to the children so it can help the children know that after their home there is another life outside the walls of their home, some key ideas are as follows:

1. BE AWARE OF WHAT YOU’RE MODELING.

It isn’t what you say, it’s what you do. If you tell the kids that soccer is about fun and skills and exercise and teamwork, but your first question is about who won the game, they’ll learn that winning is more important than anything else. If you talk about honesty but lie about their age to get a cheaper ticket into the amusement park, it not only puts your child in an uncomfortable position, they learn that cheating is okay under certain circumstances.

2. HELP YOUR CHILD DEVELOP EMPATHY.

Empathy is the foundation of compassion, which is the foundation of values. Children don't learn empathy by being told to feel it. The only way kids can learn empathy is by being treated empathically, and by watching you respond to others with compassion and kindness.

3. TALK EXPLICITLY ABOUT YOUR VALUES AND WHY THEY ARE IMPORTANT TO you.

What IS integrity? Why is respectful behavior important in a church, synagogue or mosque? What do you think of the way the press is covering a particular issue? Helping children interpret the world is a crucial responsibility of parents.

4. TALK ABOUT WHY YOU MAKE CERTAIN DECISIONS BASED ON YOUR VALUES.

Why are you voting for that candidate? In fact, why are you voting? And after you pull the curtain shut in the voting booth, let her help you vote.

5. LABEL AND REINFORCE EXPRESSION OF VALUES.

When you see your child demonstrating a value that's important to you, recognize your child for it, as specifically as possible.

6. RESIST LECTURING.

 Teachable moments only work when children are ready to learn, and most humans experience lectures as alienating. Instead, try asking questions to find out more about the decisions he's making and the thinking behind those decisions -- and share your own views sparingly. He'll probably learn more from the process of articulating his dilemmas and noticing the moral implications of his choices than he would have from a lecture -- and he'll feel more connected to you, too, because you're listening.

7. MAKE IT RELEVANT TO HIS WORLD.

Values seem almost theoretical until child start talking about their own lives -- which, believe it or not, are chock full of values-laden decisions.

8. MODEL COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT.

Whether it’s running for the school board or volunteering at your church, your kids need to see that you’re committed to the welfare of the larger community. Help them appreciate how the invisible work of others helps each of us daily, and that the more blessings we have in our lives, the more responsibility we have to extend help to others.

9. Volunteer for community service projects as a family

From coat drives to visiting the local nursing home on Valentine's Day. My children needed my leadership and coaxing to be willing to volunteer at a local soup kitchen with me, but they ended up loving it and wanting to do it again.

10. ENCOURAGE YOUR CHILD'S INITIATIVES THAT EXPRESS BUDDING VALUES.

When she decides to start a “Clean up the Park” club with her kindergarten friends, help her organize it in a way that’s manageable and safe. The world is full of projects that kids have launched to make the world a better place. She has to start somewhere.

11. CONFRONT CULTURAL MESSAGES ABOUT MONEY.

Responsible use of money is a value that is challenging to teach in this acquisitive culture. You’ll probably need to start by getting clear about your own values around money. Is being a millionaire an appropriate goal in life? When he loses his cell phone should he pay for the new one? Is it okay for your child to spend all her bat mitzvah gift money on herself? Even if your family can afford to pay for college, should he work a summer job to contribute?

12. USE DISCUSSION STARTERS.

Choose books to read and movies to watch with your child, with the express goal of building character. Of course, a careful choice is not enough, you also need to have a discussion about what you just read or watched. Does she think the character made the right decision? Why or why not? At the dinner table, come armed with a good question or two to start the ball rolling. Or share an ethical dilemma you came across today in your own life. They're all around, if you pay attention, from cutting someone off in traffic to sharing gossip.

13. ALL CHILDREN SHOULD GET AN OPPORTUNITY TO CONTRIBUTE THEIR OWN MONEY TO CHARITY.

Many families use a tripartite allowance. The lion's share is their own spending money.

Split the rest in half and put it in two separate containers, one marked "Charity," the other marked "Savings." Savings is to help buy that bike, or to buy a present for her friend, or to help pay for the class trip.

Charity (or Tzedaka, the Jewish equivalent that means restoring Justice), is to be given away to a worthy cause the child chooses. A good time to do this is their birthday, or the holiday season, but anytime is ok. Some kids will be moved by a news report of people in need and will pack off their coins to contribute. You might offer to match their contribution.

14. CONSCIOUSLY TEACH AND MODEL GOOD SPORTSMANSHIP.

Some people seem to be more competitive than others from birth, but all of us need to be taught how to be good sports. Your help will make it easier for your child to find genuine solace in a game well played, and to mean it when he says “Good game!” to every former opponent, whether he’s lost or won.

15. COMMUNICATE FAITH IN BEING "ON THE SIDE OF THE ANGELS".

Our children need to know that doing the right thing is not only the right thing to do, but the satisfying thing to do, deep inside, even when it costs us something -- and what hard moral choice doesn't cost us? To be the people we want to be, we need to believe things that aren't provably true: that most people are mostly good, that crime doesn't pay, that good conquers evil, that it is better to have loved and lost than never to have loved at all ... You can certainly add to this list. Every parent will have a different answer to the question most kids get around to asking: "Why does it matter what one person does, if no one ever knows?" My answer is, "The angels need our help."

The effects of moral upbringing on child’s academic performance in secondary schools have been a great factor in the recent decade in academic classification in the nation.

The effectiveness of a parent to a child at any set time cannot be over little. The home is very of interest and essential to a child’s well being and improvement in later life. Family unit is the key point of culture where the child's upbringing must begin since his birth, still in cradle. According to V. Hugo, the person's principles established since childhood are like letters imprinted in the bark of a adolescent hierarchy, which grow, enlarge with it making its integral part. Therefore, right beginning makes the most important part of upbringing/education.

Malfunction of the parents to congregate these exact needs can have extensive and abiding negative effects. Chris Theisen, ( 2009). This is because parent in the house are children primary educator. As a child progress from infant to kid and then to a preschool child, he learns how to speak, listen, write and read which latter build up the child to accomplish academically. The control of parents on children school achievement is well acknowledged in many studies. Gadsden (2003) says greater parental participation at early on stage in children’s learning, positively affects the child’s school performance including upper academic achievement. Harderves (1998) evaluation that family unit whose children are doing well in school display the following characters:  create a everyday family practice by providing time and a quite place to study with the· children and handing over responsibility for house hold tasks.  Check out-of-school actions, for example setting limits on TV watc4hing,· decrease time of playing, observe the groups of friends the student walk with.  support children’s development and improvement in school; that is maintain a worm· and caring home, showing concern in children’s growth at school, helping him or her with home work, discussing the worth of a good training and future profession with children. Izzo et al (1999) studied 1205 US children from kindergarten through to grade 3 in a 3 year longitudinal research programme. Teachers rated four forms of participation; regularity of parent-teacher contact; excellence of parent teacher communication; contribution in instructive activities in the home; and sharing in school activities. These factors, as well as family setting variables were examined to find any association they might have with school achievement as indexed by school grades. Consistent with other studies, Izzo et al showed that all forms of parental participation declined with child’s age and that association in the home ‘predict the widest range of performance difference. In another longitudinal study, Dubois et al (1994) showed that family support and the quality of parent child interaction notably predicted school change in a sample of 159 young  adolescents (aged 10 –12) followed in a two year longitudinal study. At-home parental involvement clearly and consistently has significant effects on pupil achievement and adjustment which far outweigh other forms of involvement. When schools work collectively with families to support learning, children tend to succeed not just in school, but all through life. In fact the most correct predictor of a student’s accomplishment in school is not income or social status, but the degree to which that student’s family is able to build a home atmosphere that encourage knowledge and to express high opportunity for their children’s future careers and become involve in their children’s education at schools and in the home.

        Coleman (1975) and Medill (1963) have argued that parental financial position and their level of education also reflects strongly on students’ performances.  This is so because it is generally accepted that the educated parents mostly value education and it affect the reasoning and understanding on how to train and lay foundation for their children to communicates.  However, the background of a child affects his success in schools.

        Levine and Harighurt (1975) discovered that all societies large or small, ancient or modern show social status group phenomenon of ranks.  The leader and people of high esteem occupying position at the top, others occupy intermediate position, yet others are at the foot of the ladder in social scale.

        Social environmental factors have been found to affect educational achievement of a child and moral upbriging.  These factors include:

a.   Occupational status of his parents.

b.  The parent’s attitude towards their children’s school and belief that they have for their children.

Boocock (1973) and Durbey (1972 & 1973) explain that parents of upper class have more positive attitudes towards their children schooling and also have high prospect and standard for the children as they are given high motivation of success in school.

The status of parents determine the nature of education that the child is bound to receive; wealthy parents often allow their children to attend private schools, while the less privilege or opportune parents send their children to public school where the school fees are affordable to them.  Students’ progress through school is reflected not only in grades list scores and accounts of personal behavior in the classroom but in the characteristics.

It’s therefore, imperative and immense benefit to look at the effect of moral upbringing on the child’s academic performance of secondary schools.

1.2   Statement of Problem

        This project is designed to investigate the effect of moral upbringing on child’s academic performance in secondary schools kolga local government.        The research aimed at investigating the extent of the following sub-problems: moral upbringing usually affect their children’s academic performance?

1.  To what extent do children from the home of low income group attend school regularly because of their parents’ inability to provide for school requirements and equipment adequately?

2.  To what extent there exist good parents – child relationship, how such affects their children’s academic performance?

1.3   Research Questions

        To evaluate the effect of moral upbringing on child’s academic performance in secondary schools kolga local government, the following research questions were raised:

1.  Is there any significant difference between children from wealthy parents and those from poor parents in terms of academic achievement?

2.  Is there any major difference between the academic ends, achievements of children from broken home and children from unbroken homes?

3.  Is there difference between the academic performance of children from polygamous families and the children from monogamous families?

4.  Is there significant difference between the academic achievement of children from educated home and those from uneducated homes?


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